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Why Does Beth Hate Jamie on Yellowstone?

Why Does Beth Hate Jamie on Yellowstone?

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Jamie and Beth grew up as brother and sister on the popular Paramount Network series Yellowstone (2018- ).

Beth made it clear from the start that she doesn’t trust Jamie, which later escalates into a vicious hatred. But why does Beth hate Jamie so much?

Beth hates Jamie on Yellowstone because he is the reason she can’t have biological children. As a teenager, Beth got pregnant with Rip’s baby and asked Jamie for help. Without telling her, he took her to a native American abortion clinic that requires sterilization as part of the process.

Leaving her in the dark about the consequences of the abortion is a betrayal Beth could never forgive Jamie for.

The fact that they have very different ideas about values, morals, and the world in general is also a reason for their toxic relationship.

Not to mention Beth has always known Jamie is adopted and not of Dutton blood. Aware of his family history, Beth is convinced Jamie has evil in him and has vowed to make his life a living hell.

Warning: *Yellowstone spoilers ahead*

Why Did Jamie Have Beth Sterilized?

As we found out from a flashback in Season 3, Jamie has knowingly let her sister be sterilized without even consulting her. However, despite all he took away from her, Jamie has always acted confused about her sister’s hatred towards him.

According to a reveal by Yellowstone stars, Jamie believes he acted in his sister’s best interest by having Beth sterilized. Taking her to an abortion clinic at the Indian Reservation was the only way to keep the incident from John and protect Rip as well.

Astonishingly, in Jamie’s mind, he did absolutely nothing wrong, which explains why he is so ignorant about his sister’s rage.

From his perspective, he was there for Beth in times of need and did his best to protect everyone involved.

Below is a brilliant video of Beth and Jamie’s troubled friendship:

Also read: Why Does John Dutton Not Love Jamie?

Does Beth Ever Forgive Jamie?

Beth can never forgive Jamie for agreeing to a hysterectomy without her knowledge. She put his betrayal down to Jamie being evil and is determined to turn every waking moment of his life into misery.

Beth also despises Jamie for repeatedly betraying the family that took him in. She loves her father and wants to please him more than anything in the world, which involves destroying those who make a move against him.

In an interview with Entertainment Tonight, actress Kelly Reilly who portrays Beth in Yellowstone raised an interesting point about her character:

“I feel really bad for Jamie sometimes. I think the relationship with Jamie and Beth is so toxic. It’s so full of betrayal. And so full of pain for her. But I think the reason why all of that exists is because she loved him.”

Before his dark act, Beth had no reason to hate Jamie. And so, it’s logical that she loved him as a sister would a brother, which is why his betrayal has scarred her for life.

Also read: 20 Best Yellowstone Characters Ranked

Why Does the Dutton Family Hate Jamie?

Beth and Jamie on Yellowstone

For all his life, Jamie has dutifully followed the path John Dutton assigned him. He went to Harvard, became a prominent lawyer, and protected his family to the best of his abilities. And yet, all the Duttons have given him is mistrust, abuse, and hatred.

The Dutton family hates Jamie because he is not a true Dutton. He was adopted as a baby and has only been tolerated in the family ever since.

At the start of the series, the Duttons’ hatred for Jamie is not obvious, save for Beth Dutton. The first major conflict between Jamie and the Dutton family happened when he “selfishly” refused to step down from running for attorney general.

The result? Disownment.

Moreover, some fans speculate that when John found out about the abortion clinic in Season 4, Beth’s lifelong grudge against Jamie became his own.

It’s also possible that all of Jamie’s traumas will creep up on him and he will become the new villain of the upcoming Season 5. Now wouldn’t that be a twist?

Also read: 20 Hard Yellowstone Quiz Questions

Why Did John Dutton Adopt Jamie?

In a shocking revelation of Yellowstone Season 3, we found out that Jamie is in fact adopted. He was only three months old when his father beat his mother to death and the Duttons took him under their wing.

It is not known why John and Evelyn Dutton adopted Jamie. Some fans speculate that his mother was Evelyn’s sister or somehow important to John.

Although unexpected, Jamie’s adoption story explained a lot about the way the Duttons treat him. Family ties could have certainly played a role in him becoming a Dutton, but we can’t be sure yet. Fingers crossed the upcoming Season 5 will bring answers to our burning questions.

Also read: What Happened to Jimmy on Yellowstone?

Who Is Jamie Dutton’s Real Father?

Jamie Dutton’s real father is Garrett Randall. He served his sentence in prison for the murder of his wife and has been living on a remote ranch before reconnecting with Jamie.

When he found out John is not his biological father, Jamie sought out his real dad for answers. Upon meeting, he questioned Randall about his past actions, who was quick to admit and justify his crime.

Through manipulation, Randall was able to win Jamie to his cause and convince him to fight for the “Yellowstone empire”.

As we later found out, the ex-prisoner was behind the series of attacks on the Dutton family at the end of Season 3.

George GG

Thursday 17th of November 2022

Let's be honest... Beth is a smokey ho... she hates Jamie because he wouldn't sleep with her...

Mike

Tuesday 5th of July 2022

RECAP: Yellowstone (S3 Ep.5) reveals, finally, the tension between Beth and Jamie. In flashback, a sixteen-year-old Beth, pregnant with Rip’s child, approaches an 18- or 19-year-old Jamie for help. She needs an abortion. Likely for good reason, neither feels free to inform John Dutton, and Rip’s tenure on the show would not have lasted long.

Jamie understands the threat of scandal likely to accompany Beth’s visit to the local Livingston hospital so, with limited options, he takes Beth to the reservation clinic. There, he learns that Native American abortions carry mandatory sterilizations. Torn, yet cornered, he leads Beth inside.

Several issues, here. First, the show presents Beth as an unknowing participant in the procedure but, almost certainly, the clinician-in-charge would have alerted Beth to the full process, including ramifications, so to gain her informed consent; and, this, even more so given Beth’s non-Native status and the clinicians’ residence, there, on planet Earth with the rest of the county who, undoubtedly, had heard of the Dutton Ranch.

Secondly, while the show conveniently neglects to mention it, almost certainly the Duttons have a family doctor—some General Practitioner who makes house calls (and has done so for years) to patch up the kids and sip rye whiskey with John. The richest family for miles, without question, the Duttons would have this guy and he would constitute Jamie’s first call.

Thirdly, the practice of Native American sterilizations ended in the Seventies, long before Beth would have sought an abortion at a reservation clinic.

Finally, and most importantly, Beth’s sterilization followed one of two courses: tubal ligation (“tubes tied”) or hysterectomy (uterine removal). A hysterectomy is major surgery, requires hospital admission and a lengthy stay (two to three days). No way a surgeon proceeds on a minor without her father’s consent. Thus, only one rational means of Beth’s sterilization remains: tubal ligation. Beth had her tubes ties. Thing is, the reversal procedures on tubal ligation have a 50% to 80% success rate. (https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/), which sets Beth’s future pregnancy chances, at least, at even money. Now, Yellowstone may reveal that Beth has undergone a failed reversal procedure but given its possibility, coupled with the likelihood of Beth’s informed consent (back when) and Jamie’s lack of options, Beth’s abiding hatred of Jamie feels misplaced.

I understand that “Yellowstone” wants to carry forward the plot point of “Beth’s hate and Jamie’s fear,” but the writers needed better homework. (Plot Point: 3 stars).